Bibliography: Torture (page 7 of 9)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Positive Universe: On Torture website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Judith Sunderland, Dimitrina Petrova, Kristina Hedlund Thulin, Daniela Bagozzi, Claude Cahn, Norman K. Denzin, Cheryl Shoenberg, Susan D. Somach, Claudia Fregoli, and Joseph Westermeyer.

Bagozzi, Daniela (1996). Rights of the Child in Guatemala. This report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by the Republic of Guatemala. The report's introductory summary asserts that although Guatemala has begun to undertake institutional and legislative efforts to fulfill its obligations under the Convention, reality still presents a grim picture for Guatemalan children. The report then presents observations and recommendations in the following areas: (1) definition of a child; (2) the right not to be subjected to torture; (3) children in conflict with the law; (4) children in situations of emergency; and (5) economic exploitation of children. The report's conclusion asserts that Guatemala's new legislation alone is insufficient in tackling the many problems of Guatemalan children, and that the rights of children in conflict with the law and in extreme poverty or hazardous conditions are continuing areas of concern. Cases of ill-treatment and miscarriage of justice against street children are included. The report concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations by the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child–Guatemala, in the following areas: positive factors, factors and difficulties impeding the implementation of the Convention, principal subjects of concern, and suggestions and recommendations. [More] Descriptors: Child Abuse, Child Advocacy, Child Safety, Child Welfare

Lacroix, Anne Laurence (1997). Rights of the Child in Ghana. This report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child by the Republic of Ghana. The report's introduction asserts that although OMCT welcomes the measures taken by the Ghanian authorities in order to bring national legislation and policy into line with the Convention, as well as the self-critical attitude adopted by Ghana's own report on its progress, OMCT regrets that Ghana's report deals only very briefly with certain of the main objectives incumbent upon the government and certain major violations affecting the rights of the child. The report then presents observations and recommendations in the following areas: (1) definition of a child; (2) age of criminal responsibility; (3) protection against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatments (penalties not proportionate to the gravity of the crimes committed against children, annihilation of criminal responsibility in certain circumstances, existence of discrimination based on the age and sex of minors); and (4) children in conflict with the law. Following its own conclusions, the report includes a summary of observations and recommendations by the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child–Ghana, in the following areas: positive factors, factors and difficulties impeding the implementation of the Convention, principal subjects of concern, and suggestions and recommendations. [More] Descriptors: Child Abuse, Child Advocacy, Child Safety, Child Welfare

Migrant Resource Centre, Townsville (Australia). (1990). Intercultural Communications Skills Conference Proceedings (Townsville, Queensland, Australia, July 1-3, 1990). This document contains 11 papers presented at a conference on multicultural issues such as cultural identity, stereotyping, and verbal and nonverbal communication: "Intercultural Communication–An Overview" (Karen Dennien); "Cultural Identity, Communication and Community Relations" (Lyn Trad); "Immigration to Australia" (Mary Woods); "Culturally Appropriate Service Delivery: A Non-Government Service Provider's Perspective" (Claude Hedrick); "If I'm Not Like You, What about Us? (Cooperation and Competition between Ethnically Different Children" (Anne V. Bleus); "Utilizing Co-Nationals as Support Network Members–The Case of Asian Women" (Pauline Meemeduma); "The Rehabilitation Unit for Survivors of Torture and Trauma (TRUSTT): A Response to the Torture Survivor and the Family" (Aidene Urquhart); "Aboriginal Issues" (Alec Illin); "Legal Professionals" [summary only] (Steve Karas); "Cultural Identity: The Representation of 'Australianness'" (Michael Singh); and "Remote and Rural Issues (Margaret Jones, Noni Sipos). [More] Descriptors: Cross Cultural Training, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Differences, Cultural Interrelationships

PECK, CAROL FAULKNER (1967). WILLIAM GOLDING'S NOVEL–THE BACKWARD LOOK. THE "SURPRISE ENDINGS" IN EACH OF WILLIAM GOLDING'S FIRST FOUR NOVELS OCCUR WHEN THE POINT OF VIEW SHIFTS FROM THE LIMITED WORLD OF THE NOVEL TO THE UNLIMITED WORLD OF REALITY. THE BOYS' RESCUE BY THE UNCOMPREHENDING OFFICER IN "LORD OF THE FLIES," REFOCUSES AND REINFORCES ALL THAT PRECEDES IT, AND THE FABLE, SUPERIMPOSED UPON REAL LIFE, BECOMES EVEN MORE FRIGHTENING UPON REFLECTION. THE SHIFT IN THE LAST CHAPTER OF "THE INHERITORS" FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF THE NEANDERTHAL MEN TO THAT OF THE CRO-MAGNON MEN BRINGS THE READER SUDDEN RECOGNITION THAT HIS IDENTIFICATION WITH THE NEANDERTHALS ALLOWED HIM TO VIEW THE CRO-MAGNONS AS OTHERS MIGHT VIEW HIM. THE REVELATION AT THE CLOSE OF "PINCHER MARTIN" THAT MARTIN'S BOOK-LONG STRUGGLE FOR SURVIVAL ACTUALLY OCCURS WITHIN A FEW MOMENTS FORCES A REVIEW OF THE NOVEL AND PREVENTS AN OVERSIMPLIFICATION OF INTERPRETATION. ALTHOUGH SAMMY'S TORTURE CHAMBER IN "FREE FALL" IS FINALLY REVEALED AS A BROOM CLOSET, THE UNCERTAINTY ABOUT WHETHER OR NOT SAMMY WAS THROWN INTO THE CLOSET BY ACCIDENT EMPHASIZES THE IRONY EITHER OF SAMMY'S EXTREME SELF-TORTURE OR OF HALDE'S UNDERSTANDING OF SAMMY'S MIND. WITH THE OCCURRENCE OF EACH "SURPRISE ENDING," THE READER IS FORCED TO TAKE A BACKWARD LOOK FROM A SUDDEN NEW PERSPECTIVE. CONSEQUENTLY, EACH NOVEL DOES NOT END IN THE READER'S MIND PRECISELY WHERE IT ENDS ON PAPER. (THIS ARTICLE APPEARED IN "MARYLAND ENGLISH JOURNAL," VOL. 6 (FALL 1967), 10-12, 17.) [More] Descriptors: English Instruction, Literary Criticism, Novels, Twentieth Century Literature

Benninger-Budel, Carin (2000). Rights of the Child in South Africa: Violence against Girls in South Africa. This report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child by the nation of South Africa. Noting that the Convention is the only "mainstream" human rights instrument that explicitly states the rights apply equally to female and male children, the report first provides observations and recommendations concerning violence against girls in South Africa. General observations in this area indicate that despite Government efforts at the legislative, policy, and awareness levels, there remain, both in law and practice, discrimination against girls and conflict between the constitution and religious and customary laws which perpetuate harmful practices against girls. This section then examines: violence against girls in the family, including early marriages, bride prices, genital mutilation, and virginity testing; violence against women in the community, specifically rape, and trafficking and prostitution; and violence perpetrated by the state, noting emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of children in residential facilities such as prisons. The remainder of the report examines application of the U.N. Convention. The introduction for this section notes the new constitution and several human rights treaties signed by South Africa. The section then notes the discrepancies among these treaties and between common law and customary rulings with regard to the definition of the child. Constitutional and legislative provisions are then noted in the areas of: child protection against all forms of discrimination; best interests of the child; right to participation; freedom from torture, inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment; deprivation of liberty; sexual exploitation and abuse; child labor; refugees and asylum seeker children; and children in conflict with the law. The concluding section notes that while the government of South Africa has adopted several measures and introduced a number of amendments to fit domestic legislation to the U.N. Convention, there are still many gaps and contradictions at the legislative level, and several problems have arisen from the economic and social conditions of the country. Specific recommendations are offered. [More] Descriptors: Child Abuse, Child Advocacy, Child Safety, Child Welfare

Cahn, Claude; Carlisle, Kathryn D.; Fregoli, Claudia; Kiuranov, Deyan; Petrova, Dimitrina (2000). Campland: Racial Segregation of Roma in Italy. Country Reports Series. This report addresses racial segregation and human rights abuses against Roma in Italy, focusing on: "Anti-Gypsyism in Italy"; "Roma in Italy: Racial Segregation"; "Abuses by Police and Judicial Authorities" (e.g., abusive raids and evictions, abusive use of firearms, torture and physical abuse, discriminatory targeting of Roma by police, theft by authorities, confiscation of papers, sexually abusive searches of women, failure to provide proper interpretation to foreign Roma accused of criminal acts, threats and police violations of the right of assembly, discrimination by judicial authorities, and expelling Roma from Italy); "Violence against Roma by Non-State Actors"; "Discriminatory Treatment of Roma in the Provision of Public Services"; "Denying Roma the Right to Education in Italy"; "The Right to Employment"; and "A Just Settlement: Recommendations of the European Roma Rights Center to the Government of Italy." Appended is "From Bad to Horrific in a Gypsy Ghetto" (Kathryn D. Carlisle). A summary in Romani is included. (Contains 121 references.) [More] Descriptors: Civil Liberties, Educational Discrimination, Elementary Secondary Education, Equal Education

Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.; Denzin, Norman K., Ed. (2003). Turning Points in Qualitative Research: Tying Knots in a Handkerchief. Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry Series. The chapters of this volume traces the changes in the discipline of qualitative inquiry over the last five decades. The collection serves as a textbook for training scholars in the history and trajectory of qualitative research. The chapters of part 1, The Revolution of Representation: Feminist and Race/Ethnic Studies Discourses, are: (1) Situated Knowledges The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective (Donna Haraway); (2) Toward an Afrocentric Feminist Epistemology (Patricia Hill Collins); and (3) Defining Feminist Ethnography (Kamala Visweswaran). Part 1, The Revolution of Representation: The Subaltern Speaks, contains: (4) The Torture and Death of Her Little Brother, Burnt Alive in Front of Members of Their Families and the Community (Rigoberta Menchu, translated by Ann Wright). Part 1, The Revolution of Representation: The Voice from Nowhere Gets To Speak: Autoethnography and Personal Narratives, contains: (5) The Way We Were, Are, and Might Be: Torch Singing as Autoethnography (Stacy Holman Jones). Part 2, The Revolution in Authority, contains: (6) On Ethnographic Authority (James Clifford). Part 3, The Revolution of Legitmation, contains: (7) Thick Description: Toward an Interpretive Theory of Culture (Clifford Geertz); (8) Quality in Qualitative Research (Clive Seale); and (9) Issues of Validity in Openly Ideological Research: Between a Rock and a Soft Place (Patti Lather). Part 4, The Ethical Revolution, contains: (10) Ethics: The Failure of Positivist Science (Yvonna S. Lincoln and Egon G. Guba). Part 5, The Methodological Revolution, contains: (11) Interviewing Women: A Contradiction in Terms (Ann Oakley); (12) On the Use of the Camera in Anthropology (Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson); (13) Taking Narrative Seriously: Consequences for Method and Theory in Interview Studies (Susan E. Chase); and (14) Representing Discourse: The Rhetoric of Transcription (Elliot G. Mishler). Part 6, The Crisis in Purpose: What Is Ethnography for, and Whom Should It Serve, contains: (15) Can Ethnographic Narrative Be a Neighborly Act? (Mary C. Savage); and (16) Rethinking Ethnography: Towards a Critical Cultural Politics (Dwight Conquergood). Part 7, The Revolution in Presentation, contains: (17) Writing: A Method of Inquiry (Laurel Richardson). Another section of part 7, Performance Ethnography and Ethno-drama, contains: (18) Performing as a Moral Act: Ethical Dimensions of the Ethnography of Performance (Dwight Conquergood); and (19) The Theater of Ethnography: The Reconstruction of Ethnography into Theater with Emancipatory Potential (Jim Mienczakowski). Another section of part 7, PoeticsAnthropological and Ethnographic, contains: (20) Foreword from Reflections: The Anthropological Muse (Dell Hymes). Part 8, The Future of Ethnography and Qualitative Research, contains: (21) Personal Narrative, Performance, Performativity: Two or Three Things I Know for Sure (Kristin M. Langellier); (22) Performance, Personal Narratives, and the Politics of Possibility (D. Suyini Madison); (23) The Anthro in Cali (Miles Richardson); (24) Shaman (Anya Peterson Royce); and (25) Tango for One (Anya Peterson Royce). Each chapter contains endnotes. Descriptors: Cultural Awareness, Ethnography, Feminist Criticism, History

Boletin del Consejo Hispano de Alfabetizacion (1990). Boletin del Consejo Hispano de Alfabetizacion (Bulletin of the Hispanic Literacy Council). The three issues of this newsletter published during 1990 contain the following articles: "You Can't Run before You Learn To Walk" (Jose Manuel Ventura); "The Truth about Police Torture" (J. Maya R.); "A Student's Testimony"; "Voices from the Community" (Gabriel Ramirez and Others); "Books and Authors" (Jose Hunter); "You and Your Health" (Arnaldo Ochoa); "Lament for Panama" (J. P. H.); "Moral War on Drugs or Immoral War on the Poorest Countries and People of the World?" (Rafael Pena Pena); "And We Had Our Conference" (Martin P.); "Literacy Conference: A Brief Overview" (Elio DeArrudah); "Hispanic Literacy Council First Annual Literacy Conference Reflections" (G. Strohschen); "Companions Forever" (A. Lorenzo and Others); "Taking Account" (Manuel Ventura); "Letters and Commentary"; "The First Conference of the Hispanic Literacy Council" (Javier Saracho); "Integrating the Classroom, the Family and the Community: True Scholastic Reform", by Carlos Heredia; "A Parable" (Jose Manuel Ventura); and "Calendar and Announcements". [More] Descriptors: Book Reviews, Community Coordination, Community Resources, Drug Abuse

Hanoun, Rasmiyah (1993). Anxiety and Its Influence on the Political Views of Palestinian Youngsters. This paper investigated anxiety among the Palestinian children in the West Bank under the Israeli occupation since 1967. The violence has been both physical and verbal and has taken different forms: trial, shooting, home raids and torture. In comparison with studies that have shown that a very small percentage of people develop fear or psychic disturbances as a result of passive or active participation in violent events, it was found in this study that some Palestinian children have actually developed in themselves a certain psychic immunity that makes it possible for them to continue normal daily life with a healthy regularity. They have grown up stronger, and more life-affirming than before the intifada. It was found that these youths received support and encouragement from parents and other family members. [More] Descriptors: Anxiety, Coping, Foreign Countries, Individual Development

Lacroix, Anne Laurence; Shoenberg, Cheryl; Schonveld, Ben (1996). Rights of the Child in Nigeria. This report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child by the Federation of Nigeria. The report's introduction asserts that the rule by decree of Nigeria's present military regime has serious implications for human rights, and that the most fundamental recommendation of any report seeking to further the interests of the rights of Nigerian children must be a return to democratic civilian rule. The report then presents observations and recommendations in the following areas: (1) the definition of a child; (2) criminal responsibility; (3) the practice of torture; (4) the use of corporal punishment as a punitive measure; (5) physical chastisement of the child in the home; (6) punishment on a gender discriminatory basis; (7) death penalty and life imprisonment; (8) summary execution; (9) arrest and detention; (10) special arbitrary detention measures; (11) detention in prison; (12) children in need of protection outside the familial environment; (13) administration of juvenile justice; and (14) de facto conditions for "Almajiris," a practice which consists of parents entrusting their children to strangers for religious teaching (these strangers then force the children to be beggars.) The report concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations by the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child–Nigeria, in the following areas: positive factors, factors and difficulties impeding the implementation of the convention, principal subjects of concern, and suggestions and recommendations. [More] Descriptors: Capital Punishment, Child Abuse, Child Advocacy, Child Safety

Lacroix, Anne-Laurence (1996). Rights of the Child in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. This report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child by the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The report's introduction points out that although OMCT welcomes Yugoslavia's efforts in keeping with the Convention, issues of concern remain, particularly the scarcity of information concerning the multiethnic nature of the Republic, and the inclusion of Serbia and Montenegro but not Kosovo and Voivodina. The report then presents observations and recommendations in the following areas: (1) non-discrimination; (2) protection against ill-treatment; and (3) children in conflict with the law. The report's conclusion includes an assertion that OMCT feels grave concern for the situation of children in Yugoslavia in general and particularly for those belonging to a minority coming under a policy of discrimination. The report concludes with a summary of observations and recommendations by the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child: Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) in the following areas: factors and difficulties impeding the implementation of the convention, principal subjects of concern, and suggestions and recommendations. [More] Descriptors: Child Abuse, Child Advocacy, Child Safety, Child Welfare

Somach, Susan D., Comp. (1995). Issues of War Trauma and Working with Refugees. A Compilation of Resources. The Center for Applied Linguistics has compiled these resources on the subjects of war trauma and working with refugees to guide refugee service providers and classroom teachers. The materials include background information about trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder and specific information about problems of refugees and victims of war trauma. The selections in the compilation are designated Appendixes. The United Nations, through its High Commissioner for Refugees and its statement on the rights of the child (Appendix A) has recognized the problems children, especially those from Bosnia, face. Two appendixes (B and C) discuss trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and refugees. Two selections focus on children and trauma and consider general developmental issues and coping with grief and the aftermath of disaster. "War Trauma and Refugee Children" contains a description of a film about the effects of torture on children, a discussion of traumatic human rights abuse, and a two-part article on the effects of massive trauma on Cambodian children. "Children of Holocaust Survivors" contains two articles on the symptoms and treatment of child survivors of the Holocaust. A brochure produced to help refugees from the former Yugoslavia cope with trauma is included, and the final section contains six selections on war trauma as an aspect of educating students in the English as a second language classroom. (Contains 19 references.) [More] Descriptors: Adults, Child Development, Children, Childrens Rights

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Barnes, Catherine; Chakma, Suhas; Mohamed, Mohamed Hamud Sheikh; Thulin, Kristina Hedlund; Monzon, Ana Silvia; Stockman, Lorne; Sunderland, Judith (1997). War: The Impact on Minority and Indigenous Children. MRG International Report 97/2. In today's internal armed conflicts that pitch one group against another, minority and indigenous children are often seen as "legitimate targets" despite the wealth of international law to the contrary. This report focuses on three recent or current armed conflicts, drawing on interviews with children and others to piece together the effects these wars have had on the Jumma children of the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh, the Maya children of Guatemala, and minority children of Somalia. Each case study provides the following: (1) background information on the conflict and intergroup relations; (2) details of violence and abuses against children (murder, torture, rape and other gender-based violence, forced recruitment as combatants, witnessing of human rights violations, loss of family and community, displacement as refugees, disruption of family and community life and infrastructure); (3) children's needs for education, health services, and rehabilitation support; and (4) recommendations to the national government, indigenous organizations, and the international community. Final sections sum up the findings and offer general recommendations to the international community. (Contains 63 references, notes, maps, an explanation of abbreviations, and text of United Nations resolutions on minority rights and children's rights.) Descriptors: Child Welfare, Children, Childrens Rights, Educational Needs

Westermeyer, Joseph; And Others (1988). Violence and Victimization in the Refugee Patient. II. Content of the Refugee Interview. This paper, the second in a series, focuses on the content of the diagnostic interview, in a clinical context, with refugee patients who have been victimized by physical violence. It is organized around a list of 11 introductory questions that will facilitate discussion of traumatic events in the patient's past. The questions focus on: (1) physical assessment; (2) adjustment to host country; (3) problems encountered in host country; (4) problems in country of first refuge; (5) flight from home country; (6) decision to leave home country; (7) life in home country; (8) experiences of purposeful mistreatment or torture; (9) subjection to threats or coercion; (10) wartime or combat experiences as civilian; and (11) wartime or combat exposure in military. In the discussion that accompanies each interview question, case histories are cited of common traumatic experiences that are unfamiliar to those who have never been refugees or war victims, and information is provided which may have clinical relevance either from a somatic perspective (e.g., central nervous system damage) or a psychosocial perspective (e.g., survival-oriented behavior inconsistent with previous personality). References are included. [More] Descriptors: Asian Americans, Clinical Diagnosis, Counselor Training, Cross Cultural Training

Westermeyer, Joseph; And Others (1988). Violence and Victimization in the Refugee Patient. I. Special Issues in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interviewing. This paper is intended for teachers, faculty instructors, and clinical supervisors whose trainees are evaluating and treating refugee patients. It addresses special issues in the diagnostic and therapeutic interviewing of refugee patients who have experienced various types of physical violence and victimization. After a brief introduction, a background section reviews the variety of contexts in which refugees may have been subjected to physical violence, including the "official" violence of torture and prison camps, and the unofficial, random violence of war zones or resettlement camps. The importance of the source of the violence is emphasized; it is easier to dissociate oneself from the violence of a despised other group than from violence perpetrated by one's own nationality, race, culture, or neighbors. It is noted that refugees may even have been forced to perpetrate violence on others, in order to survive, or they may feel responsible for the deaths or losses of others. Case histories are cited to illustrate these points, and the diagnostic purpose of interviews is highlighted in relation to such personal experiences. The remaining sections discuss the process of the interview and preparation for working with refugees, including the basic knowledge and skills required. [More] Descriptors: Asian Americans, Clinical Diagnosis, Counselor Training, Emotional Disturbances

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